11 Job Options for Registered Nurses on the Rise!

11 Job Options for Registered Nurses
11 Job Options for Registered Nurses

The nursing job market is hot right now. There are more nursing jobs available than ever before, and the demand is only going up! With the rising number of nurses and the growing competition for jobs, it can be challenging to find work. Fortunately, there are plenty of opportunities for RNs — and BNPs in particular — who are passionate about working with patients to help them achieve better health. Here are 10 career options that nurses on the rise should consider.

Registered Nurse (RN)

Registered Nurses have been providing healthcare for generations, and they still have a lot to offer today. The best-trained and most experienced nurses can deliver high-quality care in a variety of settings, including hospitals, nursing facilities, home health, and even clinics. RNs are available in a wide variety of specialties, including anesthesiology, critical care nursing, physical and occupational therapy, occupational, and speech-language Pathologists. RNs are also on staff in a variety of settings, including hospitals, prisons, and clinics.

Registered Nurses tend to work in a relatively safe environment where patients are the priority. This can be particularly important for anesthesiology and critical care nurses, who often must work in hospitals with Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and other specialized units. Many specialties have specific Nurse Practice Exposures that enable RNs to work in this setting.

Registered Clinical Nurse Specialist (R.C.N.S.)

Clinical Nurse Specialists are the advanced practitioners in nursing. They’re trained to understand both the patient’s and the healthcare team’s needs, and they’re capable of delivering expert care in a variety of settings. As a clinical nurse specialist, you can choose from a variety of specialties, including addiction medicine, mental health, and primary care. Clinical Nurse Specialists tend to work in a busy setting, and they’re often expected to deliver high-quality care in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, health plans, and private practices.

R.C.N.S. (Registered Clinical Nurse Specialist) license is a highly specialized license that only a select few can gain. To earn this license, you must complete a three-year course of study and pass a license exam. After earning the license, you’re required to complete 6 months of supervised practice. After that, you’re free to practice as a Registered Clinical Nurse Specialist anywhere you want.

Bilingual Nursing (BNP)

BNPs are bilingual by default, because they have completed a baccalaureate degree in nursing and then specialized in an area of nursing that includes both English and the language of the patient’s preferred culture or language. Bilingual nurses are in high demand, and there are currently more than 30 different specialties that employ fluent bilingual nurses. You can begin your career as a BNP by working as a clinical nurse specialist in a hospital, community health center, or other setting that has a large patient body. Since many BNP specialty practices are independent, you can decide which patients you want to care for and where you want to practice.

Medical/Surgical Registered Nurse (M.R.N.)

If you want to work in a field that uses high-intensity, hands-on care, Med/Surg R.N.s are for you. They work in all areas of the healthcare system, including ancillary services, patient advocacy, medical education, and medical research. These are challenging, rewarding jobs, often requiring two-year or four-year programs. M.R.N.s work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, hospices, and surgery centers. Some specialties have specific M.R.N. tracks, while others employ generalists who work in a variety of settings.

Psychiatric Registered Nurse (P.R.N.)

If you want to work in a field that uses high-intensity, hands-on care, Psychiatric R.N.s are for you. They work in all areas of the healthcare system, including mental health services, substance abuse treatment, and educational programming. These are challenging, rewarding jobs, often requiring two-year or four-year programs. Some specialties have specific Psychiatric R.N. tracks, while others employ generalists who work in a variety of settings.

Continuum of Care Registered Nurse (CC-R.N.)

If you want to work in a field that uses high-intensity, hands-on care, the CC-R.N. is for you. These are challenging, rewarding jobs, often requiring two-year or four-year programs. Many specialties have specific tracks for the CC-R.N., and most have programs that employ generalists who work in a variety of settings. Some CC-R.N. programs also employ clinical researchers to conduct applied research in the fields of nursing and health policy.

Advanced Practice Nurse

If you want to work in a field that uses high-intensity, hands-on care, the Advanced Practice Nurse is for you. These are challenging, rewarding jobs, often requiring two-year or four-year programs. Some specialties have specific tracks for the Advanced Practice Nurse, while others employ generalists who work in a variety of settings. Some specialties have adoption trackers who want to get involved in the after-care of infants and children, while others employ generalists who want to work with adults.

Conclusion

As the number of nursing jobs continues to grow, so do the number of career options for those who want to pursue a career in nursing. The number one reason people give for not wanting to become a nurse is financial, so the best way to get into nursing is to get into the workforce planning and saving for a nursing degree. Once you have a degree, you can explore a variety of career options, such as nursing, boba nursing, or even nursing assistant. It’s important to remember that being a nurse isn’t just about giving care — it’s about more than that.

Noah Chapman
Hello, Im Noah Chapman. Im Editor And SEO analysis for Cambridgehack.com. Im a man with 3 beautiful angels towards me. That my beautiful wife, and two beautiful daughters.