CNA Salaries & Jobs Overview – Career Guide

CNA Salaries & Jobs Overview
CNA Salaries & Jobs Overview

The job market in Community Nutritionists is challenging, but rewarding. If you are looking for a career that offers good money and a steady lifestyle without the stress of a 9-to-5 job, then becoming a community nutritionist may be right for you. To learn more about the various health care careers available, check out our guide to jobs in the healthcare industry. Once you’ve found a field that interests you, check out listings of openings to see if anyone is hiring in your specific specialty area. On the flip side, if you’re not interested in working in an already busy field and prefer to stay on the quiet side of things, apply with subtle confidence to community nutritionist jobs boards to see if any open positions materialize within your preferred territory.

What is a Community Nutritionist?

A community nutritionalist is a health care professional who specializes in providing nutritional and health information to their local community. As the name suggests, a community nutritionist works primarily in a public health setting; that is, they provide nutritional information to the general public. The type of community in which a nutritionist works can vary greatly, depending on location and availability of qualified professionals. Some nutritionists work in academic settings as part of a school’s dietetic program, while others work for self-iprotection. Both groups of professionals are expected to be certified by the National Commission for Certification as a Dietetic Technician (NCCDT).

Job Titles and Descriptions

Registered dietitian (RD) is the most common job title used to describe a community nutritionist. Other titles that may be used include certified applied nutritionist (CAPN), certified health promotion specialist (CHPS), and certified human nutritionist (CHen). Some employers also offer associate’s degree programs in nutrition or dietetics that qualify you to work as a dietitian.

Working Conditions for Community Nutritionists

As a community nutritionist, you will work in a health clinic, hospital, or other facility where the patients are the main focus. You may also work in a school or government facility where the public is the main focus. Most job openings occur in this latter setting. You will typically work an average of five to seven hours each day, including weekends and holidays. Most nutritionists work a 19- or 20-hour week, with some working 36 or even 48 hours. Work schedules may be structured so that you have some flexibility, though most schedules are set in stone. You may work in a private practice setting, or as an independent contractor. In either case, you will need to purchase a professional license.

Education and Training for Community Nutritionists

Most community nutritionists are required to earn a bachelor’s degree in nutrition or food science. Generally, the bachelor’s degree is the minimum requirement for entry into the field. Many community nutritionists go on to earn a master’s degree or even a doctorate. Some may pursue additional training as certified health promotion specialists (CHPS), a recognized certification track for those working in the field of health promotion. Some may also choose to go the non-traditional route and earn a professional certification such as the Registered Dietitian (RD) or the Certified Human Nutritionist (CHQN). To earn a non-traditional certification, you must pass a rigorous series of exams and be approved by a board-accredited nutrition or dietetic program.

Avg. Salary of a Community Nutritionist

The average salary of a community nutritionist is $69,520, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). This number takes into account both the number of jobs and the employment level, as well as the range of jobs and the average. Unfortunately, the average is based on limited data; the BLS only reports data for the most recently completed two months. As a result, the statistics are lower than they could be. Topping the list is empty-Nursing, which pays $85,120 per year, followed by registered dietitian ($69,520), certified applied nutritionist ($46,560), and certified health promoter specialist ($25,720).

Tips For Successful Applications

Keep in mind that the field is in a high-growth mode, and there may be limited openings if you’re not actively looking for work. If possible, apply for open positions as they come up; don’t try to put out fires on your own. If you’re unable to apply for open positions, try to put your best foot forward when doing schedule organization, patient contact, and documentation review.

Conclusion

The job market in Community Nutritionists is challenging, but rewarding. If you are looking for a career that offers good money and a steady lifestyle without the stress of a 9-to-5 job, then becoming a community nutritionist may be right for you. To learn more about the various health care careers available, check out our guide to jobs in the healthcare industry. Once you’ve found a field that interests you, check out listings of openings to see if anyone is hiring in your specific specialty area. On the flip side, if you’re not interested in working in an already busy field and prefer to stay on the quiet side of things, apply with subtle confidence to community nutritionist jobs boards to see if any open positions materialize within your preferred territory.

Noah Chapman
Hello, Im Noah Chapman. Im Editor And SEO analysis for Cambridgehack.com. Im a man with 3 beautiful angels towards me. That my beautiful wife, and two beautiful daughters.