The Top 10 Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Salaries & Jobs in the US

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Salaries, Certificates, & Jobs
Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Salaries, Certificates, & Jobs

The job of a nursing assistant is quite demanding. The responsibilities are also quite extensive. It requires not only an extensive knowledge of Health care but also a profound understanding of nursing principles and procedures. A nursing assistant may be hired to help with patient care as well as assist other staff members in hospitals, nursing homes and facilities. Working conditions for this occupation can vary considerably from state to state since the duties and responsibilities of a CNA will largely depend on the employer. In order to work as a nurse’s aide in any given state, an aide must first obtain a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) certification from the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (COAALHEP). A registered nurse (RN) is also eligible to become a CNA and achieve this credential through study and examination by COAALHEP. The following list explains the most commonly recognized CNA salaries in the country:

Medical CNA ($78,000+)

The median annual income for a medical CNA in the U.S. is $78,000. The top 10% of workers earn more than $93,000, while the lowest 10% earn less than $48,000. The majority of workers (75.6%) work in non-acute care settings, such as long-term care facilities, elementary and secondary schools, and private homes. Some of the top benefits for medical CNA jobs include:

Psychiatric/Cognitive CNA ($58,000+)

The job market for cognitive and psychiatric CNAs is expected to grow 16% over the next eight years. These jobs typically involve tasks such as monitoring the patient’s medication regimen, managing the patient’s complex medical needs, and teaching patients and caregivers how to function with various medications and devices. As a CNA, you will work in a hospital, nursing home, or other setting where individuals with mental illness may be treated. You may help patients with a variety of conditions such as major depression, anxiety disorders, insomnia, and diverse substance use disorders. You may also work in a home health setting where you will assist patients with a variety of tasks such as ambulating, lifting, meal prep, basic housekeeping, etc.

Home Health Care Aide ($44,000-$50,000)

Home health aide programs, also known as “personal care assistant” or “caregiver” programs, are increasing in popularity among the nursing workforce. The average salary for a home health aide in the U.S. is $39,990. This job is not only popular with the aging population, but also people who are chronically ill such as cancer patients, individuals on long-term medications, and people with disabilities. The job market for home health aide is expected to grow at a healthy clip over the next several years.

Registered Nurse (RN) ($52,000+)

Registered Nurses (RNs) are not only skilled in providing patient care, they are also highly adept at managing the administrative aspects of health care. As a registered nurse, you can choose from a variety of careers in nursing, including certified nursing assistant (CNA), advanced practice registered nurse, hospitalist, and critical care nurse. The job market for RN is good with an expected 15% increase in job opportunities over the next five years.

Supervisory Nursing Assistant (SNA) ($35,000+)

The job of a supervisory nursing assistant is to help support and assist nursing staff members. This job is often related to a staff member’s administrative duties, such as scheduling, ordering, and tracking. Supervisory SNA jobs usually start at about $35,000 per year.

Bilingual (English and Spanish)

Spanish is one of the official languages of the United States. As a bilingual (Spanish and English), you will have an advantage in the job market since many nursing care facilities have bilingual staff. You will usually be required to pass a bilingual competency test.

Bottom Line

The best-paying jobs for nursing assistants are in nursing facilities or hospitals. These facilities typically employ several CNAs per day and require highly specialized skills. In order to work as a nursing assistant in any given state, an aide must first obtain a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) certification from the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (COAALHEP). A registered nurse (RN) is also eligible to become a CNA and achieve this credential through study and examination by COAALHEP.

Noah Chapman
Hello, Im Noah Chapman. Im Editor And SEO analysis for Cambridgehack.com. Im a man with 3 beautiful angels towards me. That my beautiful wife, and two beautiful daughters.